Contracts of Employment

Written statements are required by law to be given to all employees (full and part time) who have been employed for at least one month and must be provided within two months of the employee joining the business.

“A contract of employment is an agreement that sets out an employee’s employment conditions, rights, responsibilities and duties.”

 

Employment contract gives the employee clarification about their rights and what is expected from them. Both employers and employees must stick to a contract of employment until it ends, e.g. by an employer or employee giving notice or an employee being dismissed or until the terms are changed.

Failure to provide an up-to-date, complete contract of employment can lead to a financial award of 2-4 weeks’ pay.

Did you know that contracts do not have to be in writing to be legally binding? Even if there is no written agreement, once an employer has made a job offered to someone on certain terms and conditions and they have accepted it, an agreement is reached and a contract of employment exists.

 

We can provide the following types of contracts:

 

  • Permanent Contracts
  • Temporary (Fixed Term) Contracts
  • Casual Contracts
  • Standard Business Terms and Conditions
  • Consultant Agreements
  • Sub-Contractor Agreements
  • Associates Agreements (SLA)
  • Internship Agreements
  • Apprenticeship Agreements
  • Traineeship / Work Experience Agreements

 

Note: If you need to change the current contracts of your existing employees, bear in mind that consultation is key – you cannot simply force a change. If the employees have been properly briefed on the reasons for the change(s) and understand the need for this, it is much easier to gain acceptance than if the change(s) are simply presented as a “done deal”.

 

Contract Review

We can review your existing contracts of employment free of charge to ensure that they are up to date and legally compliant. Call us today on 01522 583963 to discuss your requirements in more details.

Contact us for free HR advice